Jan Brueghel the Younger Lucas van Uden - Wooded Landscape with a Game Still Life

Jan Brueghel the Younger
Lucas van Uden - Wooded Landscape with a Game Still Life - image-1
Jan Brueghel the Younger
Lucas van Uden - Wooded Landscape with a Game Still Life - image-1

Jan Brueghel the Younger
Lucas van Uden

Wooded Landscape with a Game Still Life

Oil on panel. 51 x 74 cm.

The present work combines a landscape by the Flemish artist Lucas van Uden, a pupil and collaborator in the studio of Rubens, with a game still life in the foreground painted by Jan Brueghel the Younger. As yet, no documentary evidence for such a collaboration between these two artists has emerged, and alongside one further work in a Belgian private collection, this is the only piece on which the two are known to have collaborated. The Belgian work depicts a similar wooded landscape with a panoramic view in the distance and almost identical game in the foreground, but in a different composition. Klaus Ertz has confirmed the various depictions of animals to be based on models devised by Jan Brueghel the Elder and Frans Snyders. The combination of a landscape with animals “as the sole protagonists of a painting” was an innovation at this time (Ertz op. cit., p. 77). In the works of Jan Brueghel the Elder, the artist's father, animal still lifes such as this were always embedded into biblical or mythological scenes.
The present work can boast an interesting provenance, having belonged to the important old masters collection of Edward Habich (1818-1898) from Kassel until 1892. Habich founded a company in the United States and travelled to Boston frequently. His collection of 166 old master paintings was sold by Lempertz in 1892. However, the auction did not take place as usual in Cologne, being instead held in the “great hall of the art gallery in Cassel”. With the support of Emperor Wilhelm II, the painting gallery in Kassel was able to purchase seventeen works for its collection before the auction. The National Gallery in London purchased 13 works from the collection, and they were also able to subsequently secure a piece by Lucas Cranach the Elder from this auction in 1926. After featuring in the 1892 auction, and a further successful sale by Lempertz in 1973, this work has now once again found its way back to our house.

Lot 2070 Dα

Estimate:
70.000 € - 80.000 €