Bernd and Hilla Becher Hilla Becher Bernd Becher - Winding towers

Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-1
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-2
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-3
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-4
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-5
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-6
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-7
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-1Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-2Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-3Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-4Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-5Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-6Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher - Winding towers - image-7

Bernd and Hilla Becher
Hilla Becher
Bernd Becher

Winding towers
1970s

6 vintage ferrotyped gelatin silver prints. Each 24 x 17.8 cm. Each with photographer's stamp on the verso.

“It is not technology in the form of water towers, gas tanks, winding towers or lime kilns that is made accessible by the photographs of Bernd and Hilla Becher; what is made accessible through them are images. The photographs do not simply reproduce reality, nor do they interpret it; rather it seems the contrary: reality appears more and more like that what the camera shows. The eminent and not to be underestimated achievement of Bernd and Hilla Becher lies not least in the fact that they have directed our view to what we previously did not perceive at all, or at least not in the way it appears in the Bechers' photographs. It is ultimately an aesthetic attitude that can refer to Paul Klee, among others, whose sentence 'Art does not reproduce the visible, but makes visible' is recalled here.” (Quoted from: Armin Zweite, Bernd und Hilla Bechers “Vorschlag für eine Sehweise”. 10 Stichworte, in: Bernd and Hilla Becher. Typologien industrieller Bauten, exhib.cat. K20K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, Munich 2003, p. 15).
The present tableau, taken by Bernd and Hilla Becher in the 1970s, is from the estate of the artist and photographer Horst H. Baumann (1934 - 2019). Originally trained in the natural sciences, Baumann worked since the 1950s as a photojournalist and was represented many times at photokina in Cologne, before he began working artistically with the medium of light. In 1977, like the Bechers, with whom he had personal contact, he took part in documenta 6 and installed his laser sculpture 'Laserscape Kassel'. Four years later he realised his installation 'Lichtzeitpegel' at the Düsseldorf Rheinturm. Both installations are still in operation today. Baumann's works have also been exhibited internationally, including in the Whitney Museum in New York.

Provenance

From the artists to Horst H. Baumann; Estate of Horst H. Baumann, Mannheim

Lot 36 D

Estimate:
40.000 € - 60.000 €