Meet the
Makers

Munich

Lempertz auction house is represented worldwide: What began at our headquarters in Cologne has extended to include branches in major European cities such as Berlin, Brussels, and Munich as well as representatives in Zurich, Milan, Vienna, London, New York, and São Paolo. In our Meet the Makers series we travel the international world of Lempertz to speak with the experts behind the scenes. This time we met up with Emmarentia Bahlmann and Hans-Christian von Wartenberg in Munich, the city with the oldest Lempertz representative branch.

Fotos: Tavis Beck, Jay Lee, Max Hofstetter und Daniel von Appen
München

Lempertz auction house is represented worldwide: What began at our headquarters in Cologne has extended to include branches in major European cities such as Berlin, Brussels, and Munich as well as representatives in Zurich, Milan, Vienna, London, New York, and São Paolo. In our Meet the Makers series we travel the international world of Lempertz to speak with the experts behind the scenes. This time we met up with Emmarentia Bahlmann and Hans-Christian von Wartenberg in Munich, the city with the oldest Lempertz representative branch.

Photos: Tavis Beck, Jay Lee, Max Hofstetter, and Daniel von Appen
Welcome to Munich – a city of collectors
Welcome to Munich – a city of collectors

Emmarentia Bahlmann

I moved from Munich to Cologne 40 years ago when I got married in 1978. Lempertz was my first employer after leaving university, and it has remained so ever since! I continued working for the company when I returned to Munich in 1982. At the time, auction houses rarely had representatives, but I was able to establish Lempertz in my home town in Bavaria. I had studied in Munich and still felt deeply connected to my home, so over the years I was able to create a broad network of contacts which helped Munich grow into an important branch.

 

I am so happy that since January my daughter Antonia has been working to extend the Lempertz branches into Vienna and Austria. She grew up with Lempertz, studied art history in Vienna and knows the business. I am glad that this deep affinity is continuing in my family.

 

My work is very varied, both in terms of the artworks I see and the people I meet. In this job it is important to like people, and I do. You get to know so many different people, since every work of art we sell has a story behind it. You need to be interested in people and be a good listener. Selling art has a lot to do with trust.

Hans-Christian von Wartenberg

Our working year is divided into two periods of six months, as the auctions in Cologne, Berlin, and Brussels take place twice annually. These six month periods always begin with the closing of the previous auction season whilst we simultaneously collect objects for the upcoming one. The customers come to consign works to us, or we make appointments for them with the experts in Cologne, all the time collecting items for the upcoming auctions. Once we have finished acquiring enough works, we pack them up carefully and send them to Cologne to be catalogued. After the catalogues are published we organize previews of selected items from the upcoming auctions here in Munich. These usually include works from every department, from Old Masters and Decorative Arts to Modern and Contemporary Art. These works are then transported back to Cologne and the auction can take place. Then the whole process begins again!

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Munich – the city of collectors

Munich has a long tradition of collecting that started with the aristocratic house of Wittelsbach which ruled until the Revolution. They laid the foundations for the collections of the Pinothek museums. In the past, the ruling family in Munich always led the way when it came to collecting, but this has since been taken over by private individuals. We have a number of fantastic private collections in Munich, some of which are even open to the public, such as the Goetz Collection.

Photo: Jan Antonin Kolar

Museum quarter

The area surrounding the Pinakothek museums in Munich is known as the museum quarter. It includes the Old Pinakothek with Old Master paintings, the New Pinakothek with 19th century works, and the Modern Pinakothek which houses four collections including the design collection and the Museum Brandhorst. The Egyptian Museum and the Film Academy are also located in this area, so you can really spend days there!

 

Emmarentia Bahlmann

Photos: Detlev Klockow, © Pinakothek der Moderne: Photos by Haydar Koyupinar and Massimo Fiorito, © Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte Pinakothek, München, Photo: Haydar Koyupinar

Gallery quarter

Munich also boasts a large and vibrant gallery quarter. In the last few years it has extended further into Glockenbach quarter. The famous art dealer Fred Jahn has a gallery here with his son, and there are numerous young galleries with equally young patrons located around Hans-Sachs-Straße. They usually meet there for the openings on Thursdays to discuss art and network.

 

Emmarentia Bahlmann

Königsbau at the Munich Residenz

The Königsbau section of the Munich Residenz is on a similar level to the Bavarian National Museum. It houses the collection of artworks which remained in the Residenz and thus presents an impressive insight into life at the Electoral and Royal courts over the past 300 years.

 

Hans-Christian von Wartenberg

Bavarian National
Museum

My favourite thing about Munich is of course the Bavarian National Museum, located just around the corner from the Lempertz branch. I like to refer to it as the greatest museum that no one’s ever heard of! It houses a magnificent collection with an especially fine selection of decorative arts from the previous centuries that includes many world class pieces. It can easily compete with the greatest decorative arts museums in the world, including the Vienna Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

 

Hans-Christian von Wartenberg

For the evenings, Schumann’s Bar is one of the best addresses. It’s an ideal place to meet up and get to know people of all ages from the art scene.

 

Emmarentia Bahlmann

Schumann’s Bar, © Schumann’s GmbH

Eating out in Munich

Some of the most popular places to eat in Munich are the traditional taverns, like “Tattenbach” in Lehel or “Schneider Weißes Bräuhaus” in Tal, both fantastic restaurants. They are especially popular with young people who love to go there to chat, play cards, and eat traditional Bavarian food.

 

Emmarentia Bahlmann

The Schneider Bräuhaus München

The Lehel

Lempertz’ Munich branch can be found in the centre of town between Prinzregentenstraße, Maximilianstraße and the Isar, it really couldn’t be more central! Our branch is located in the “Lehel” quarter on St.-Anna-Platz next to the eponymous St. Anne’s church. This large late 19th century church stands directly opposite the smaller church of St. Anne, which alongside the Wieskirche is one of the finest Rococo churches there is, a true gem. The Lehel quarter used to be a much poorer area, but its central location and pleasant atmosphere have made it one of the most lively and popular quarters in Munich. It is also known as “Pumuckl-Land”, as the popular German children’s series “Pumuckl” was filmed here!

 

Emmarentia Bahlmann